Mack Armored Car1-4

Mack: General
Date of first acceptance 1916 Total acceptances 1
Manufacturer Mack Brothers Co. Crew 5-7 men
Mack: Dimensions
Combat weight 9,052lbs
4106kg
Height over MG barbettes 100"
250cm
Length overall 236"
599cm
Width 76"
190cm
Wheelbase 144"
366cm
Mack: Armament
Type Mount
Two .30cal Colt MGs Flexible in passenger compartment
Mack: Armor
.2"
.5cm
Mack: Automotive
Engine 4 cylinder, 4 cycle, gasoline
Horsepower 45
Steering Steering wheel
Mack: Suspension
Road wheels
2/side (dual rear)
Mack: Performance
Max level road speed 30mph
50kph

The Mack armored car, based on Mack's AB 2-ton truck, was privately financed for the New York National Guard along with two similar vehicles, one based on Locomobile's 6-cylinder 48 hp truck and the other on a White truck chassis. The White vehicle also used a 4-cylinder engine, weighed 8,690lb (3,942kg), and could travel at 30mph (50kph). The open-topped armored bodies were essentially identical, and a machine gun could be mounted on each side of the vehicle near the opposite corners of the rear compartment. The gunners were protected by shields, though these were noted as "barbettes" in contemporary sketches. The engine radiator grilles of the vehicles took different shapes throughout their lives in response to cooling requirements, and were sometimes made of sheet metal. All three vehicles saw service along the Mexican border in the mid-late 1910s, but none saw actual combat.

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References

  1. Hunnicutt, R.P. Armored Car: A History of American Wheeled Combat Vehicles. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 2002. Reprinted from Armored Car, R.P. Hunnicutt ©2002, available from Presidio Press, 505B San Martin Drive, Suite 160, Novato, CA 94945.
  2. AGF Board No. 2. Development of Armored Vehicles, volume II: Armored Cars, Scout Cars, and Personnel Carriers.
  3. Crismon, Fred W. U.S. Military Wheeled Vehicles. Minneapolis: Victory Publishing, Ltd., 2001.
  4. Tank Data, vol. 2. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD: US Army Ordnance School, Jul 1958.

Last updated 3 May 2017.
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