105mm Gun Tank M60 at the Russell Military Museum.

The turret and armament on this vehicle appears similar to that of the M48A5 tank, but the hull is noticeably different. The front hull is wedge-shaped and straight as opposed to M48's rounded bow, and the exhaust pipe for the personnel heater can be seen exiting to the hull's right side, in front of the fender stowage box. The lens for the rangefinder can be seen in the armored blister on the turret side, and the gunner's telescope was provided with a cover in the canvas dust shield. Although obscured from view, this early-production machine has one lifting eye forward on the turret roof and two to the rear. Later turrets had this arrangement reversed.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the Russell Military Museum.

This tank is such early production that it was one of the fifteen afflicted by insufficient hull armor, and was consigned to training.

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The turret is reversed on this machine, and the gun is secured in its travel lock on the rear deck. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The large size of the cupola is easily seen in this overhead view. The contour of the turret casting around the rangefinder blisters is also easier to discern. The air cleaners for the engine reside on the fenders between the stowage boxes. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The tank can be seen from the right rear; note the bulge in the turret casting under the commander's cupola. A cutout can be seen in the right-hand exhaust grille for the mounting of a deep-wading exhaust stack. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The exhaust stack assembly (A) is mounted on this tank. Other fixtures installed to prepare for wading include: B. Fuel filler vent tube. C. Stack assembly support (left and right). D. Release assembly (left and right). L. Fuel filler vent hose. M. Release cord. The remaining letters are reminders to install or remove specific drain plugs and seals. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The external interphone was mounted on the right rear fender, and is visible in the previous image. A signal light on top of the interphone's protective box could be flashed by the driver to gain the attention of accompanying infantry, and likewise the infantry could flash a signal light on the driver's control box C-2297/VRC by pressing the handset switch. A 20-foot (6m) self-recoiling cord attached the handset. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

A shallower view of the turret again shows the contour of the side casting as it meets the cupola. The rangefinder blisters and gunner's telescope on this tank have been covered over.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

The road wheels on the M60 are forged aluminum, and there are reinforcing struts running around the circumference of each wheel. This vehicle has also been fitted with friction snubbers on the first and last road wheels stations. Both the commander's and loader's hatches are open on this vehicle. On this later-production turret, there are two lifting eyes forward and a single one to the rear.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

The stowage mount for the xenon searchlight can be seen on the left rear corner of the turret roof; the supports are attached around the turret ventilator blower cover. Side-loading air cleaner boxes are visible on the tank's fender just ahead of the rear stowage box.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

The turret ventilator and searchlight stowage mount are shown here from above. An antenna mount is in front of the ventilator.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

This tank features top-loading air cleaners, as opposed to the machine above.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

A top-down view of the top-loading air cleaner is provided here.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

M60 retained the idea of a very large cupola from the M48, and like in the older tank, the .50cal machine gun could be aimed, fired, and reloaded from under armor. Folded forward beside the gunner's periscope is an interrupter bar to prevent the TC from machine gunning the searchlight.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

A closer shot of the M19 cupola shows the contour of the machine gun mount without its canvas dust cover. The gunner's flat-topped periscope housing is in front of the cupola, and mounting posts for the interrupter bar are welded to the roof beside the periscope housing. The power receptacle for the searchlight can be seen in the middle of the turret roof.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

The commander was provided with a door behind his periscope housing. The pad welded to the side of the cupola was a leftover from early production when mounts for the M2HB machine gun were attached to the cupola while the M85 was experiencing production issues.

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The interior of the cupola is shown in this picture. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The commander's position in the turret is shown here. He could override the gunner's inputs via his control handle, and use it to traverse the turret, and elevate and fire the gun. On the opposite side of the handle was a magnetic brake actuator that, when squeezed as the commander gripped the handle, allowed the commander to assume control from the gunner. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

A schematic of the turret traverse and elevation system is sketched in this image. The relationship of the commander's override handle to the gunner's controls and traverse mechanism can be seen. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The location of components of the fire control system is the subject of this drawing. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The commander's rangefinder was a coincidence model that did not require the visual acuity of older stereoscopic rangefinders. The commander used the vertical and horizontal adjustment knobs to align the target images from the left and right lenses until they were in coincidence. Once this occurred the range could be read through the range scale window. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The right side of the gunner's position is labeled in this picture. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The front of the gunner's position is shown here. The 105mm gun breech is to the lower left of the image. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

A closeup of the ballistic computer M13A1D is provided in this picture. The range input shaft transmitted range information from the commander's rangefinder, and the superelevation output shaft likewise transmitted superelevation information from the computer to the ballistic drive. The superelevation handcrank allowed manual input of superelevation data into the computer. The range scale was graduated from 0 to 4,400m in 100-m increments. The range correction knob was used to compensate for variable conditions that could affect the gun's performance, such as ambient air temperature and density, gun tube wear, range error, and ammunition variation. It was graduated in intervals of 1% of the range for a total of ±15%. Tube wear was measured by the number of armor-piercing discarding sabot tracer (APDS-T) rounds fired: one round of APDS-T was the equivalent of 40 high-explosive plastic tracer or 1.5 high-explosive antitank tracer rounds. If the tube was new, a correction of -1% was entered. If 10 rounds of APDS-T equivalent had been fired, the correction was 0%, 20 rounds was +1%, 30 rounds was +2%, 40 rounds was +3%, 50 rounds was +4%, 80 rounds was +5%, 90 rounds was +6%, 110 rounds was +7%, 130 rounds was +8%, 150 rounds was +9%, 170 rounds was +10%, and 190 rounds and above was +11%. The inner matching dial indicated the same range as the rangefinder when the correction was 0%, and indicated different ranges depending on the correction factor. The outer matching dial could be manually operated by the superelevation handcrank or electrically operated by the computer, and rotated between the static range scale and the inner matching dial. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

The loader had a D-shaped hatch to the left of the M19 cupola, and another interrupter bar protected the searchlight when it was stowed on the left rear of the turret.

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The left rear of the turret under the loader's hatch is illustrated here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The forward portion of the loader's position is the subject of this picture, and the 105mm gun breech dominates the lower part of the image. The replenisher indicator tape was used to judge the amount of hydraulic oil in the replenisher; if one side of the tape had a rough edge while the other was smooth, the amount of oil was sufficient. If both edges of the tape were rough, the replenisher needed additional oil. If both edges were smooth or there were long notches on each side, the replenisher needed bled or drained. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

A stowage socket for the .50cal M2HB machine gun was welded to the turret rear. Another antenna mount is visible on the turret roof to the right of the lifting eye.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

Details of the xenon searchlight mount and power cable can be seen in this image. The visible opening in the canvas dust cover was for the coaxial machine gun.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the Marcellus, Michigan, VFW Post 4054.

The searchlight receptacle is uncapped on this tank, and the interrupter bar is erected.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the Russell Military Museum.

Another example of the plugged-in searchlight is provided here. The forward turret lifting eye can be seen behind the searchlight.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

The driver's hatch was surrounded by a semicircle of three M27 periscopes, and an M24 infrared periscope could be fitted in his hatch door.

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The front of the driver's compartment is labeled in this picture. For clarity, his seat is shown in the dumped position. The purge pump handle was used to purge the fuel lines and pumps of air after the vehicle had been sitting for a period of time. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The right side of the driver's position is shown here. The control box C-2297/VRC to the right had the signal light that infantry using the external interphone could flash. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

Ammunition stowage tubes can be seen in this view of the left side of the driver's compartment. The turret seal hand pump and pressure gage were used when preparing the tank for deep-water fording or during chemical attack. Normal pressure in the seal was 0psi, but under the above two conditions it was to be inflated to 25psi (1.8kg/cm²). During a combat situation while fording the pressure could be decreased to 5-7psi (.4-.5kg/cm²) to permit the turret to traverse. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The driver had an escape hatch in the hull floor under his seat. The seat is in the dumped position in this image. To release the hatch, the lever was pulled towards the hatch cover's center, allowing the hatch to fall away. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the First Division Museum.

The position of the escape hatch is seen here on the hull underside.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the Marcellus, Michigan, VFW Post 4054.

The dual volute spring bump stop for the front road wheel station is highlighted in this image.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the Marcellus, Michigan, VFW Post 4054.

The rear road wheel, its bump stop, and the attachment of the rear shock absorber can be seen here.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 at the Marcellus, Michigan, VFW Post 4054.

This tank wears the later T142 track with replaceable rubber pads, and some of the pads are missing, allowing a view into their cups. The headlights are also gone on this machine, as is one of the external handles for fire extinguisher activation, located under the guard behind the lifting eye. Details of the fender and mud guard attachment can also be gleaned.

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105mm Gun Tank M60 in Decatur, Michigan.

This image shows one difference between the aluminum road wheels (left) and the steel road wheels (right). The track center guides would wear the aluminum wheels at a much faster rate, and these therefore sported a steel ring to be affixed to their inner faces.

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

The left side of the gun mount M116 is illustrated here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60.

Ammunition stowage in early M60s is drawn here. In later tanks with a smaller AN/VRC series radio in place of the earlier AN/GRC series, eight rounds were stowed in the turret bustle. (Picture from Tank Data, vol. 3.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The longer and wider nature of the M60A1's turret is easily seen from above. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The side contour of the turret was also modified, which can especially be seen under the commander's cupola. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

Note the enlarged turret stowage basket and the relocation of the searchlight stowage bracket to the right side of the turret rear. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The traverse and elevation system can be contrasted to the initial version above. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The commander's position in the new turret is illustrated here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The gunner's station is seen in this picture from the opposite side of the 105mm gun. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The front of the gunner's position in the new turret is labeled. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The ballistic computer M13A2 is detailed in this picture. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The turret rear is seen here; note that the gun is in the travel lock to the rear, and consequently the driver's position is visible below the turret ring. The turret bustle was occupied by radio racks, the ventilator, and ammunition stowage. On the left of the image across from the loader's seat is the commander's seat, and the commander's observation seat can be seen at the top left in the stowed position. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

Fixtures on the left side of the turret are labeled in this image. The rangefinder exits the turret side just forward and below the loader's hatch. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The loader's side of the 105mm gun is seen here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The driver's steering control was changed from a conventional-type steering wheel to a T-bar. A right turn was accomplished by pulling the right handgrip to the rear, and vice-versa. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The driver's position's right side is seen here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

This image shows the left side of the driver's compartment. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

Features found on the RISE tank are labeled here. A. Personnel heater exhaust. B. Driver's vision blocks. C. Driver's hatch. D. Driver's periscope cover. E. Fender stowage box. F. Engine air cleaner. G. Rear fender stowage box. H. Fire extinguisher release handles. J. Track. K. Tow hooks. L. Headlights. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

E. Fender stowage box. F. Engine air cleaner. G. Rear fender stowage box. K. Tow hooks. M. Main gun travel lock. N. External interphone box. P. Engine access grille covers. Q. Compensating idler wheel. R. Compensating idler wheel adjusting link. S. Shock absorber. T. Track support roller. U. Roadwheel and hub. V. Drive sprocket. W. Taillights. X. Tow pintle. Y. Transmission access grille doors. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

A. 105-mm gun tube. B. Bore evacuator. C. Gunner's telescope port. D. Gunshield cover. E. Caliber .50 machine gun barrel. F. Smoke grenade launchers. G. Gunner's periscope. H. Machine gun interrupter. J. Commander's periscope. K. Commander's hatch. L. Smoke grenade stowage boxes. M. M19 commander's cupola. N. Cupola vision blocks. P. Turret ventilating blower cover. Q. Bustle rack, stowage. R. Antenna mounts. S. 5-gallon [20L] can stowage. T. Loader's hatch. U. Loader's periscope cover. V. Rangefinder blister. W. Searchlight power receptacle. X. Searchlight bracket. Y. 7.62-mm machine gun port. Z. Searchlight. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The tank's internal arrangement can be seen in this sketch. A. Headlight stowage brackets. B. 105-mm gun mount. C. Replenisher assembly. D. Breech operating handle. E. Loader's guard. F. Rangefinder. G. Commander's platform. H. Gunner's guard. J. Observation seat (stowed). K. Radio equipment. L. Oddment tray. M. Inflatable hull-to-turret seal. N. Transmission. P. Engine exhaust elbows. Q. Universal joint. R. Hull drain valves. S. Engine air cleaner intakes. T. Gunner's seat. U. Turret platform. V. Torsion bars (total of 12). W. Driver's escape hatch. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The hull's internal components are drawn from above. A. Personnel heater. B. Driver's instruments. C. Driver's controls. D. Batteries. E. Fuel tanks. F. Transmission shroud. G. Final drives. H. Engine. J. Driver's seat. K. Fire extinguisher release handle. L. Fixed fire extinguishers. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The underside of the hull is represented here. M. Driver's escape hatch. N. Fuel tank drain plug access cover. P. Hull drain valves. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The driver's controls are labeled in the following series of illustrations. A. Driver hatch control. B. M27 periscope. C. Brake pressure gage. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

D. Tachometer/Hour meter. E. AN/VVS-2 night vision viewer (RISE PASSIVE tanks) or IR periscope M24 (RISE tanks). F. Speedometer/odometer. G. Powerplant warning lamp [lights if engine oil pressure, engine oil temperature, or transmission oil temperature is in red area]. H. Steering control. J. Heater air outlet door. K. Accelerator pedal. L. Transmission shift control. M. Smoke generator indicator light. N. Intercom control panel. P. Smoke generator switch. Q. Air cleaner blower switch. R. Master control panel. S. Indicator panel. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

T. Manifold heater switch (on end of purge pump handle) [Turns fuel to manifold heaters on and off. Turns power to manifold heater spark plugs on and off.] U. Purge pump handle. V. Accelerator lock lever [locks accelerator pedal in preset position]. W. Forward drain valve control lever. X. Rear drain valve control lever. Y. Gas particulate air heater switch and indicator (located at rear of driver's seat). Z. Escape hatch lever. AA. Driver seat control levers (4). AB. Brake pedal. AC. Headlight dimmer switch. AD. Turret seal pump. AE. Manual fuel shutoff handle and latch. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The gunner's position is the subject of the following series. A. Telescope M105D. B. Diopter ring. C. M32 periscope (RISE tanks). D. Ballistic shield operating handle. E. Ballistic shield lock plunger. F. Gunner's switch box. G. Stabilization control selector. H. Deflection knob. J. Deflection lock. K. Elevation lock. L. Elevation knob. M. Light source control. N. Reticle selector. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

P. Elev Balance knob [eliminates main gun stabilization elevation drift]. Q. Main gun switch. R. Machine gun switch. S. Elev/Trav power switch. T. Stab switch [turns on stabilization system from standby]. U. Power switch [places stabilization system in standby mode when on]. V. Trav balance knob [eliminates turret stabilization traversing drift]. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

W. Unity power window. X. IR body. Y. M32 IR body diopter ring. Z. Daylight body deflection knob. AA. IR body elevation knob. AB. IR body deflection knob. AC. Daylight body elevation knob. AD. IR switch [selects vehicle power or battery for IR body]. AE. Daylight body diopter ring. AF. Daylight body. AG. Source control knob [adjusts daylight body and infinity sight reticle brightness]. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

AH. Interphone control box. AJ. M13A2 ballistic computer. AK. Rheostat knob. AL. Superelevation handcrank. AM. Superelev mil counter. AN. Ammo indicator. AP. Reset pushbutton switch. AQ. Ammo selector handle. AR. Range correction knob. AS. Outer (superelevation) pointer. AT. Inner (range) pointer. AU. On/off circuit breaker. AV. Rheostat knob. AW. M28E2 azimuth indicator. AX. Resetter knob. AY. Firing buttons. AZ. Manual traversing handle. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

A. M13A3 elevation quadrant. B. Elevation scale. C. Rheostat. D. Level vial tube. E. Manual firing handle. F. Firing button. G. Manual elevating handle. H. Gunner's control handles. J. Magnetic brake palm switch. K. Gas particulate air heater switch. L. Micrometer scale. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE).

The passive night vision instruments are shown here. A. Daylight body diopter ring. B. Unity power window. C. Passive body (RISE PASSIVE tanks). D. Passive body diopter ring. E. Shutter lever. F. Power switch. G. Reticle control. H. Tube control [controls passive body image intensification]. J. Daylight body deflection knob. K. Passive body deflection knob. L. Passive body elevation knob. M. Daylight body elevation knob. N. Daylight body. P. Light source control. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The tank commander's station is detailed in the following images. A. M17A1 rangefinder. B. Cupola electrical power control switch. C. Control box [for remote radio frequency selection]. D. Searchlight remote. E. Interphone control box. F. Commander's control handle. G. Palm switch. H. Firing switch. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

J. Grenade launcher switch. K. Power switch [for smoke grenade launcher system]. L. Power light. M. Emergency stab shutoff switch. N. Domelight. P. Blower switch [for ventilator blower]. Q. Stabilization power indicator. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

R. Gas particulate air heater switch. S. Searchlight control. T. Receiver-transmitter RT 246/VRC [only in some vehicles]. U. Battle override switch [restores communications power if circuit breaker opens during battle]. V. Audio frequency amplifier AM 1780/VRC. W. Receiver R-442/VRC [not on all vehicles]. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

A. Elevation handle [for manual elevation of caliber .50 machine gun]. B. Machine gun trigger switch. C. Caliber .50 machine gun access door. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

D. Headrest adjust lever. E. M36 periscope (RISE tanks). F. unity power window. G. Light source control. H. Caliber .50 machine gun electrical safety switch. J. Cupola traverse control handle. K. IR body diopter ring. L. Ballistic shield control handle. M. IR body. N. IR switch [to select vehicle or battery power]. P. Elevation knob. Q. IR body and daylight body deflection knobs. R. Daylight body elevation knob. S. Daylight body diopter ring. T. Daylight body. U. Azimuth lock and interlock. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE).

A tank with passive night vision is the subject of this and the following images. A. Daylight body diopter. B. Unity power window. C. Passive body reticle control. D. Passive body diopter ring. E. Light source control. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE).

F. Shutter lever [opens shutter and depresses power switch when moved down]. G. Passive body power switch. H. Tube control [controls passive body image amplification]. J. Passive body. K. Daylight body deflection knob. L. Passive body elevation knob. M. Passive body deflection knob. N. Daylight body elevation knob. P. Daylight body. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The breech of the 105mm gun is shown in this picture. The gun's normal recoil length was 12" (30cm) with a maximum of 13.5" (34.3cm), and the estimated gun tube life was 400 equivalent full charge rounds. A. Plunger. B. Breech operating handle. C. Main gun safety switch. D. Trip lever [allows safety switch to move from fire to safe]. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-1.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE).

The dispersion of the smoke grenade launchers is sketched here. The left and right patterns had their own firing buttons; to discharge all grenades, both buttons needed to be pressed. (Picture from TM 9-2350-257-10-2.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

Ammunition stowage in late M60A1s is drawn here. Earlier tanks had a three-round stowage tray instead of the three-round tubular stowage rack. (Picture from Tank Data, vol. 3.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE).

This vehicle is also fitted with the aluminum wheels, but note the horizontal hull tiedown eyes compared with vertical hull tiedown eyes the above vehicle. M60 and M60A1 hulls up to serial number 5025 had three vertical tiedown eyes rated at 20,000lb (9000kg) each. M60A1s from serial number 5026 and 152mm gun-launcher tanks M60A2 from serial number 4426 had four horizontal tiedown eyes rated at 490,000lb (220,000kg) side load and 413,000lb (187,000kg) oblique load. Late-production hulls were fitted with only two horizontal lifting eyes, as the middle two were deleted. This tank is equipped with the 1kw AN/VSS-3A xenon infrared searchlight, which is plugged into the receptacle on the turret roof. The light had a peak candlepower output of 50 million, and could operate with a compact beam of 1° minimum or a spread beam of from 1° to 7°. In front of this on the gun tube is a pyrotechnic device to simulate the firing of the main gun. The right-hand blister for the coincidence rangefinder is visible near the top of the turret just below the commander's cupola. Armored top-loading air cleaners are also visible on the rear fenders between the stowage boxes. This tank belonged to the 24th Infantry Division, and was taking part in Exercise GALLANT EAGLE '79 at Eglin Air Force Base. (Picture taken 25 Oct 1978 by SSGT Dwight A. Jackson; available from the Defense Visual Information Center.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE) in Pōhakuloa Training Area, Hawaii.

The loader's hatch and commander's cupola are open on this machine, allowing a glance at the roof armor thickness. The empty mount for the AN/VSS-3A searchlight is present above the gun tube. An armored top-loading air cleaner can be seen on the fender. The tanks belonged to A Troop, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. (Picture taken 10 Sep 1983 by Al Chang; available from the National Archives.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE).

This Marine tank is fitted with explosive reactive armor (ERA). These tiles are composed of explosive sandwiched between two steel plates. When struck by a high-explosive antitank (HEAT) shell or missile, the HEAT penetrator detonates the explosive, sending the plates in opposite directions. This action destabilizes the HEAT penetrator, making it less effective at penetrating the tank's armor. This tank was participating in the US/Thai exercise THALAY THAI '89. (Picture taken 1 Sep 1989; available from the Defense Visual Information Center.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE) at the US Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks.

A view of the turret front without the canvas dust cover is provided here. The aperture in the gun shield for the gunner's telescope M105C has been blanked off. The three attachment points for the searchlight can be seen above the gun tube, and its capped power receptacle on the turret roof is visible. The small pipe to the driver's right on the hull roof is the bilge pump outlet.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1(RISE)(PASSIVE) at the US Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks.

The gun shield is shown in profile in this image. The coaxial machine gun aperture is on this side of the vehicle.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A1.

The gun mount M140 can be seen here removed from the tank.. (Picture from TM 9-2350-215-10.)

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This early-production M60A2 retains the bore evacuator on the 152mm gun-launcher. Details of the suspension, such as the aluminum road wheels and friction snubbers on the first two and last road wheels, are also visible. A 23" (58cm) 2.2kw 100 million candlepower xenon searchlight is mounted on the turret's left side, in front of the loader's hatch. An infrared filter could be used as well, black on the AN/VSS-1 searchlight and pink on the AN/VSS-2. The light could be used in overdrive mode for 15-20 seconds once every five minutes, which increased its output to 150 million candlepower. The beam width for both the AN/VSS-1 and -2 was either 0.5-0.75° in narrow mode or 7° in wide mode. The beam was 1.2° high in each mode. With white light, the lamp had a planning range of 1500m; with the pink filter the AN/VSS-2 had an infrared planning range of 1000m.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

The narrow cross-section of the turret can be glimpsed here. The upper part of the turret was not much wider than the gun mount, and the turret widens near the base for the gunner's and loader's stations. The service headlights and infrared headlights are obvious; above these in both headlight groups is a blackout driving light, and below them is a blackout marker light. The mounting locations for the driver's three M27 periscopes are visible in the upper hull, and the exhaust for the personnel heater can be seen running from the right side of the hull roof to the tank's right fender. This vehicle is running on the T142 track with replaceable rubber pads.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2.

The barrel of the gun-launcher on this tank lacks the bore evacuator seen on the previous vehicles. It is equipped with the closed-breech scavenging system, which rendered the bore evacuators redundant. The introduction of this system came about due to issues with burning fragments of the combustible ammunition cases remaining in the gun breech after the round had been fired. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2.

This rear view shows the bulge under the rear louvres cause by the addition of the CBSS. The system was comprised of two 3100psi (220kg/cm²) air bottles, two gear-driven compressors, and other associated equipment, and it would deliver three 1000psi (70kg/cm²) shots of air after each main gun round was fired. The system was triggered by the recoil of the gun-launcher. Across the back of the turret, from left to right, is a stowage basket, turret ventilator blower, and the stowage point for the searchlight. The large size of the commander's cupola can also be ascertained. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2.

A closer look at the characteristic bulge under the exhaust grilles present on CBSS-equipped tanks is provided here. There is a pronounced lip along the bottom of the grilles that overlaps this bulge. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2.

The Cross-Drive transmission has been removed in this image, and the CBSS installation including the air compressors can be seen at the bottom rear of the assembly. (Photo by Mark Halpin.)

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

M60A2 possessed a new commander's cupola, which is illustrated here. His M51 periscope is mounted at the top of the cupola, and the circular mount for the .50cal machine gun is offset to the right. Both cupola and turret were stabilized in azimuth and elevation. The gunner's M50 periscope is visible on top of his hatch on the turret's low right side. A tow cable is stowed on the side of the turret, and a stowage basket rings the turret rear.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The loader had a hatch on the left side of the turret, and an M37 periscope was installed in it. Ammunition was uploaded through the loader's hatch. A tow cable is again present, and details of the xenon searchlight mount and wiring can be seen here.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

The loader's hatch is open here, and the thickness of the armor surrounding the hatch can be gleaned.


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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The bore evacuator on the 152mm gun-launcher is apparent, positioned about halfway down the short gun tube. The housing above the gun was for the Shillelagh missile's infrared transmitter. The gunner's M126 telescope is visible, and under the padlocked cover above the telescope is the aperture for the tank's laser rangefinder. The telescope was the sight used for the missile, and the primary sight for canister and coaxial machine gun engagements. It was the secondary for HEAT-MP shells after the gunner's M50 periscope. The external triggers for the tank's fire extinguishers are visible under the guard on the hull front slope.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2.

The components of the laser rangefinder system are shown here installed in the turret. (Picture from FM 17-12-4 Tank Gunnery for M60A2 Tanks.)

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2.

The components of the missile guidance system are shown here. (Picture from FM 17-12-4 Tank Gunnery for M60A2 Tanks.)

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The M60A2 gunner's controls are shown here. His handles are obvious in the middle of the image, and to the left is his panel and computer control unit. The M126 telescope is above the gunner's panel, and his periscope M50 is to the right of his handles. The ammunition box in the center of the turret floor was used to stow eight conventional rounds.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This view is up into the commander's cupola. The microphone and intercom control box are visible on the turret wall, and the cupola traverse mechanism is behind the TC's left shoulder.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This is the gunner's laser ranging control unit, which allowed him to select which laser return the computer used as the basis for a target's range. It is located just to the left of his periscope.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This view is looking across the turret to the loader's position. Stowage for the firing circuit tester, gunner's quadrant, and spare lamp are labeled, and the loader's panel is mounted on the left turret wall. The breech of the 152mm gun-launcher is on the right of the picture.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This view highlights the commander's panel on the left side of his cupola. The knobs and toggle switches on the panel perform functions related to target designation and gun stabilization. His handles are visible in the bottom of the image, and the browpad for his M51 periscope is above the handles.

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152mm Gun-launcher Tank M60A2 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The right side of the commander's cupola is shown here. The M19 ballistic computer control unit is in the center of the image, and this allowed the TC to adjust for crosswind speed, cant, parallax, ammunition type, gun jump, and drift. Some of the eleven vision blocks ringing the base of the cupola are visible, and the M51 periscope is on the left of the image.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

This tank is externally similar to the M60A1 above. Friction snubbers on the first two and last road wheels are obvious. The front road wheel arm was equipped with double bump stops, compared to single bump stops on the other wheels. The single bump stops can be seen behind the road wheels. The exhaust pipe for the personnel heater can be seen in front of the forward fender stowage box, and a triangular mount for a smoke grenade launcher assembly is visible on the forward turret below the grab handle.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3.

Details of the top of the tank can be seen in this image. (Picture from TM 9-2350-253-20-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual--Tank, Combat, Full Tracked: 105-mm Gun, M60A3 (2350-00-148-6548) and (2350-01-061-2306) TTS Turret.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

The forged aluminum wheel on the right is easily contrasted with the steel wheel on the left; reinforcing ribs easily differentiate the aluminum wheels. The mounting for the road wheel swing arms are obvious, as are the bump stops behind each road wheel.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

The linkage for the adjustable compensating idler wheel is shown here. The rubber pads on the T142 track are secured by a bolt that goes through the track block.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

This view of the driver's hatch shows the mounts for the periscopes around his position, as well as for the night vision device in the hatch door itself. This hatch had originally been designed for the infrared periscope M24, but was then modified to accept the AN/VVS-2 passive viewer.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS).

The interior of the driver's position is shown here. The steering T-bar is pivoted to the right. In this position, the tank would turn to the left while moving forward, and to the right while in reverse. The large perforated pedal is the accelerator, while the brake is to the left and the headlight dimmer switch is below and to the left of the brake pedal. The gauge between his left and center periscopes is the tachometer, with the speedometer in the opposite space. The red warning light above and to the right of the speedometer alerted the driver to high engine or transmission oil temperature, or low transmission oil pressure. The small gauge above the steering linkage and below the tachometer measured brake pressure. The white transmission shift lever is convenient to his right hand, and the gauge panel can be seen to the lower right of the image. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

The right side of the turret was home to the commander's cupola and the gunner's periscope sight. The round aperture for the commander's M85 machine gun is visible in the cupola's front, and a periscope guard is present on top of the cupola. From the turret mounting surface, the cupola is 21.56" (54.76cm) tall to the periscope guard and 16.57" (42.09cm) without the periscope guard. Its inner diameter was 34" (86cm) and its total diameter was 52.25" (132.7cm). With the M85 machine gun and 180 rounds of ammunition, the cupola weighed 2439lb (1106kg). Mounted just beside the gunner's periscope is an interrupter bar that, when swung to the vertical position, was meant to prevent the commander's machine gun from firing down onto the gun shield-mounted searchlight. The rounded top to the gunner's periscope guard indicates that this tank is equipped with the AN/VSG-2 tank thermal sight. Non-TTS tanks (like the M60 above) had a flat-topped periscope guard.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS).

The right side of the turret is detailed in this picture. The commander's seat is elevated to the right, and the gunner's position is directly to the front and below. The commander's black control handle sits atop the turret traverse gearbox assembly; the commander's control handle was connected to the gunner's control assembly by the two rods: the upper elevation rod and lower traverse rod. The unmarked white box directly behind the gearbox assembly on the turret wall is the electronics controller unit. Directly behind his control handle on the turret wall with is his ammunition select box. The black box on the turret wall above and to the right of the ammunition select box is the commander's communication control box, and the networks box for the cupola power switch and circuit breakers for the stabilization electronics and power pack blower motor is to the right of this. The laser rangefinder can be seen near the top of the image; the upper black knob was for adjusting deflection while the lower knob was for adjusting elevation. In front of the turret traverse gearbox is the gunner's azimuth indicator, with his large control unit and smaller stabilization control box and gun control boxes going forward along the turret wall. Above the stabilization control box is the turret hand traverse drive; the shaft from this handle connects to the turret gearbox assembly via the no-bak assembly, which prevents the rotation of the hand traversing drive handle when the turret is using hydraulic power, or when the turret rotates due to being on a slope or when the gun tube strikes an obstacle. The gunner's control handles can be seen on the lower left. The tank thermal sight is not mounted, but the commander's extension would snake along the turret wall above where the rods exiting the front of his override handle have been bent downward. The gunner's telescope remains, however. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Fort Irwin, California.

The shape and thickness of the commander's cupola door can be seen in this image. This tank from the 1ST Battalion, 108th Armor, 48th Brigade, Georgia National Guard was taking part in an annual training exercise, hence the MILES sensors on the turret and pyrotechnics mounted on the main gun's bore evacuator. (Picture taken 15 Jul 1983 by Long; available from the National Archives.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

The loader had his own hatch in the left side of the turret roof, and an M37 periscope was provided in his hatch door. The flexible base of the crosswind sensor is visible on the rear of the turret, and hidden from view behind the commander's cupola is a turret ventilator. The left-side rangefinder blister is empty since the laser rangefinder only occupied the opposite blister. Note that the xenon searchlight receptacle has been capped on this tank, since it was no longer necessary.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS).

The 105mm ammunition stowage in the turret bustle is shown here. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3.

The mounting of the crosswind sensor is detailed here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-253-20-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual--Tank, Combat, Full Tracked: 105-mm Gun, M60A3 (2350-00-148-6548) and (2350-01-061-2306) TTS Turret.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

The protective flap on this blister would open when the laser rangefinder was in use. The rangefinder could detect targets from 200m to 4700m and had a maximum lasing rate of 3 per minute, or 6 per minute for 2 minutes followed by a 3-minute cooling period. An armored fender-mounted air cleaner is visible behind the rangefinder blister between the fender stowage boxes.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3.

The internal components of the laser rangefinder are shown here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-253-20-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual--Tank, Combat, Full Tracked: 105-mm Gun, M60A3 (2350-00-148-6548) and (2350-01-061-2306) TTS Turret.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Decatur, Michigan.

The mount for the left-side smoke grenade launcher is shown here, absent the launcher itself. The power receptacle cap is unscrewed.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

The travel lock for the tank's 105mm gun was placed on the covering for the insulated exhaust tunnel. The tunnel was lined on both sides by air intake louvres for the engine. A wire stowage basket is present on the rear of the turret.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3(TTS) in Chillicothe, Ohio.

The exhaust grille doors are highlighted here, and the shape of the armor below these can be contrasted with the M60A2 with the CBSS. The square in the right-side door is for mounting a deep-water fording exhaust stack, and the two square panels under the grille doors were for access to the tank's transmission.

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3.

The positioning of some turret components are sketched for us here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-253-20-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual--Tank, Combat, Full Tracked: 105-mm Gun, M60A3 (2350-00-148-6548) and (2350-01-061-2306) TTS Turret.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3.

The key for the above diagram is: 1. M85 machine gun in commander's cupola. 2. M240 machine gun. 3. Radios in turret bustle. 4. Brass receptacle container on co-axial machine gun mount. 5. Interphone and control boxes. 6. Antennas and wind sensor mast. (Picture from TM 9-2350-253-20-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual--Tank, Combat, Full Tracked: 105-mm Gun, M60A3 (2350-00-148-6548) and (2350-01-061-2306) TTS Turret.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3.

The various components of the turret and gun control system are diagrammed here. (Picture from TM 9-2350-253-20-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual--Tank, Combat, Full Tracked: 105-mm Gun, M60A3 (2350-00-148-6548) and (2350-01-061-2306) TTS Turret.)

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105mm Gun Tank M60A3.

Details of the tank's ballistics drive are drawn in this picture. This assembly mechanically connects the gunner's periscopes and laser rangefinder to the gun mount in order to keep them synchronized. The ballistics drive also added superelevation from the computer output unit and changed the line-of-sight of the gunner's periscopes and rangefinder according to this superelevation. (Picture from TM 9-2350-253-20-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual--Tank, Combat, Full Tracked: 105-mm Gun, M60A3 (2350-00-148-6548) and (2350-01-061-2306) TTS Turret.)

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Last updated 19 Oct 2021.
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